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Presidential Vetoes

1789 - 2008

This is a comprehensive listing of Presidential vetoes (What is a veto?) of legislation enacted by Congress, from 1789-2005. For more current data, see a comparison of modern presidents or the vetoes of G.W. Bush.

The veto power is established by the US Constitution:

Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he approves he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his Objec- tions to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and pro- ceed to reconsider it.

If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House re- spectively.

If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in which Case it shall not be a Law.
President Congress Regular
Veto
Pocket
Veto
Total
Vetoes

Overrides
Success
Rate
Washington 1st - 4th 2 0 2 0 100%
Adams 5th - 6th 0 0 0 0 na
Jefferson 7th - 10th 0 0 0 0 na
Madison 11th - 14th 5 2 7 0 100%
Monroe 15th - 18th 1 0 1 0 na
J. Q. Adams 19th - 20th 0 0 0 0 na
Jackson 21st - 24th 5 7 12 0 na
Van Buren 25th - 26th 0 1 1 0 na
W. H. Harrison 27th 0 0 0 0 na
Tyler 27th - 28th 6 4 10 1 83.3%
Polk 29th - 30th 2 1 3 0 100%
Taylor 31st 0 0 0 0 na
Fillmore 31st - 32nd 0 0 0 0 na
Pierce 33rd - 34th 9 0 9 5 44.4%
Buchanan 35th - 36th 4 3 7 0 100%
Lincoln 37th - 39th 2 5 7 0 100%
A. Johnson 39th - 40th 21 8 29 15 26.8%
Grant 41st - 44th 45 48 93 4 91.1%
Hayes 45th - 46th 12 1 13 1 91.7%
Garfield 47th 0 0 0 0 na
Arthur 47th - 48th 4 8 12 1 75%
Cleveland 49th - 50th 304 110 414 2 99.3%
B. Harrison 51st - 52nd 19 25 44 1 94.7%
Cleveland 53rd - 54th 42 128 170 5 88.1%
McKinley 55th - 57th 6 36 42 0 100%
T. Roosevelt 57th - 60th 42 40 82 1 97.6%
Taft 61st - 62nd 30 9 39 1 96.7%
Wilson 63rd - 66th 33 11 44 6 81.8%
Harding 67th 5 1 6 0 100%
Coolidge 68th - 70th 20 30 50 4 80%
Hoover 71st - 72nd 21 16 37 3 85.7%
F. D. Roosevelt 73rd - 79th 372 263 635 9 97.6%
Truman 79th - 82nd 180 70 250 12 93.3%
Eisenhower 83rd - 86th 73 108 181 2 97.3%
Kennedy 87th - 88th 12 9 21 0 100%
L. B. Johnson 88th - 90th 16 14 30 0 100%
Nixon 91st - 93rd 26 17 43 7 73.1%
Ford 93rd - 94th 48 18 66 12 75%
Carter 95th - 96th 13 18 31 2 84.6%
Reagan 97th - 100th 39 39 78 9 77.8%
G.H.W. Bush1 101st - 102nd 29 15 44 1 96.3%
Clinton 103rd - 106th 36 1 37 2 94.1%
G. W. Bush 107th - 108th 0 0 0 0 na
109th - 110th 10 0 10 2 80%
Total   1,494 1,066 2,560 108 93%
1. President Bush attempted two pocket vetos during intrasession recess periods. Congress considered the two bills enacted into law because of the president's failure to return the legislation. The bills are not counted as pocket vetoes in this table.

Sources: Senate Reference


 
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