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Party in Power

Political Makeup up Congress in the 2000s

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Which party controls the U.S. House of Representatives? Which party has the power in the U.S. Senate?

Here's a current guide to the political makeup of Congress and the White House. For a more in-depth, visual guide to the party in power of Congress dating back to the 1940s, please visit this website.

113th Congress

  • White House: Democrat (Barack Obama)
  • House: Republicans held 232 seats, Democrats held 200 seats; there were two vacancies
  • Senate: Democrats held 53 seats, Republicans held 45 seats; there were two independents

112th Congress: 2011 to 2013

  • White House: Democrat (Barack Obama)
  • House: Republicans held 242 seats, Democrats held 193 seats
  • Senate: Democrats held 51 seats, Republicans held 47 seats; there was one independent and one independent Democrat

111th Congress: 2009 to 2011

  • White House: Democrat (Barack Obama)
  • House: Democrats held 257 seats, Republicans held 178 seats
  • Senate: Democrats held 57 seats, Republicans held 41 seats; there was one independent and one independent Democrat

*Notes: U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter was re-elected in 2004 as a Republican but switched parties to become a Democrat on April 30, 2009. U.S. Sen. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut was re-elected in 2006 as an independent candidate, and became an Independent Democrat. U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders of Vermont was elected in 2006 as an independent.

110th Congress: 2007 to 2009

  • White House: Republican (George W. Bush)
  • House: Democrats held 233 seats, Republicans held 202 seats
  • Senate: Democrats held 49 seats, Republicans held 49 seats; there was one independent and one independent Democrat

*Notes: U.S. Sen. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut was re-elected in 2006 as an independent candidate, and became an Independent Democrat. U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders of Vermont was elected in 2006 as an independent.

109th Congress: 2005 to 2007

  • White House: Republican (George W. Bush)
  • House: Republicans held 232 seats, Democrats held 202 seats; there was one independent
  • Senate: Republicans held 55 seats, Democrats held 44 seats; there was one independent

108th Congress: 2003 to 2005

  • White House: Republican (George W. Bush)
  • House: Republicans held 229 seats, Democrats held 205 seats; there was one independent
  • Senate: Republicans held 51 seats, Democrats held 48 seats; there was one independent

107th Congress: 2001 to 2003

  • White House: Republican (George W. Bush)
  • House: Republicans held 221 seats, Democrats held 212 seats; there were two independents
  • Senate: Republicans held 50 seats, Democrats held 48 seats; there were two independents

*Notes: This session of the Senate began with the chamber evenly divided between Republicans and Democrats. But on June 6, 2001, U.S. Sen. James Jeffords of Vermont switched from Republican to independent and began caucusing with the Democrats, giving the Democrats a one-seat advantage. Later on Oct. 25, 2002, Democratic U.S. Sen. Paul D. Wellstone died and independent Dean Barkley was appointed to fill the vacancy. On Nov. 5, 2002, Republican U.S. Sen. James Talent of Missouri replaced Democratic U.S. Sen. Jean Carnahan, shifting balance back to the Republicans.

106th Congress: 1999 to 2001

  • White House: Democrat (Bill Clinton)
  • House: Republicans held 223 seats, Democrats held 211 seats; there was one independent
  • Senate: Republicans held 55 seats, Democrats held 45 seats

For a more in-depth, visual guide to the party in power of Congress dating back to the 1940s, please visit this website.

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